Expository Essays.

Expository Essays.

Writing Introductions and Conclusions

Purpose of the Introduction

  • Sets the tone for your paper
  • Identifies and sets the limit of your subject
  • Orients your reader by explaining the specific context and rationale for your thesis
  • Presents your thesis or central claim for your subject
  • Engages your reader’s attention and persuades her to
    keep reading

Introduction Components

  • Hook
  • Transition / Context
  • Thesis

TIPS

  • Illustrate: Show instead of tell.
  • Challenge: Raise reader expectations.
  • Quote: Make use of the wordsmiths.
  • Compare/contrast: Evoke familiarity by comparing or create tension and expectation by contrasting.
  • Define: Define-or redefine in a unique way.
  • Make a provocative statement: Offer an amazing statistic or personal insight.

Illustrate (anecdote)

Introduction

  • We took our sons fishing in the spillway next to the dam one moonlit night. In the hush of the night, one of them hooked a small trout. But when the landed fish screamed aloud, my son fled the scene in horror and has never eaten flesh since.

Conclusion

  • People adopt vegetarian and vegan diets for different reasons, not all of them out of horror, as my son did. Whatever their reasons, they are finding more options in grocery stores, restaurants, and cookbooks than ever before.

Example (HELP)

Introduction

  • The Chico city council recently approved six hundred new homes to go in on the east side of the city. The impacts this development will have are likely to be extreme, illustrating the problems all California cities face in managing growth.

Conclusion

  • How well Chico will cope with the increased traffic, pressure on schools and impacts to the watershed is yet to be seen. But Chico is not alone in having to find solutions soon.

Challenge

Introduction

  • Chances are, if you live outside city limits in any of California’s twenty-one rural counties, you couldn’t use public transportation if you wanted to. There isn’t any.

Conclusion

  • Sure, Californians need to get over their love affairs with their cars, but having a better system of public transportation in place would help. Then, perhaps, I could get from rural Durham to rural Oroville, where I live, without putting yet another car on the road.

Question

Introduction

  • Does it make sense to prohibit minors from carrying calamine lotion with them at school without two kinds of written permission, and yet allow them to leave campus without parental knowledge or consent for invasive medical procedures?

Conclusion

  • Even more than many of the zero-tolerance laws in place in our schools, this one should be ditched. Does it
    make sense? Clearly, it doesn’t.

Other methods

  • Onomatopoeia
  • Dialogue
  • Imagery
  • Simile / Metaphor

 

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